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Kirengeshoma Palmata — 36 Comments

  1. Hi Alistair – thanks for featuring Kirengeshoma – a new one on me and an addition to my wishlist. If it’s Japanese and shady, I’m keen! Hence loved your lantern (do you have the Kirengeshoma in this locale?) Many of your ornaments are aged and look as though they belong. Nice collection

  2. I like most of your ornaments Alistair, especially the moss covered Toadstool. I thought mary was meant to look like that, like a ruin 🙂

    The Kirengeshoma palmata is new to me and I like it, one definitely for my wishlist especially I’m attracted to plants with ‘palmata’ on it. Love the foliage!

  3. Lovely flower that is new to me…and ohh all the beautiful yard art as we call it…beautiful pieces of sculpture that has weathered nicely…love the fountain and bird bath and the planter…

  4. Well, this plant is new to me, too. I’m not sure I have enough shade – most of my garden is full sun. Love the ornaments that have moss on them. Just gives them so much character, I think. I also like that black grass in front of the water feature!

  5. Hello Alistair, thanks for highlighting the K plant – its name confuses my tongue – we do not have any but a local garden Lytes Cary has a huge shady bed of it and all the visitors are amazed and ask what it is…talk about dramatic leaf!

    • Hi Carolyn, are you confused mostly with getting Kirengeshoma when looking for Magnolia or as is more likely my short captions with a slight Scottish flair. The first statue is aimed at Mary Queen of Scots losing her head at the reluctant orders of the English Queen Elizabeth. (Ach I’ll fix it the morn)—— if I have the time and am in the mood, I will stick your head back on tomorrow. (Wot you lookin at) there is a tiny fairy at the bottom of the picture looking straight at the camera, hence—- what are you looking at. Don’t know why you are hiding your face—- well any woman with a body like that has no need to look coy. At times I do have to remind myself that visitors to my posts are international. Always look forward to your visits and comments on my posts.

      • Now you are confused. On the popular page on Blotanical your post had the title “Magnolias at Kew”. I assume that was a mistake. I got the caption for the headless statue (we Americans do read our history too), but I just wanted to know how your statue actually lost its head. Does your Scottish flair extend to beheading statues?

        • Hi Carolyn, Quite right of course you read history, after all I know about Geronimo and Buffalo Bill. I cant imagine why my post on blotanical is under the title Magnolias at Kew. Mary lost her head when I one day picked her up by the napper and away it came in my hand. Her official name is Hebe.

    • Hi b-a-g, cant really think of a story other than the wife was unusually attracted to it. It is very old yet does not age, ah, that maybe answers the attraction.

  6. Hey, love your blog! It caught my attention as I am an American born Bonnie with Scottish ancestors. Your garden is very creative. I love the art. The planter, toadstool, and bird bath are my favorites. Thanks the lovely photos and good humor.

  7. Blotanical No 174. Out of 2,577! Congratulations to a fully fledged BlotSprout ;~)

    Hope to see Mary, with reattached head, soon. I rather like your stone mushroom. That seems a peculiarly British idea. Do you know where why how it started?

    • Marys head is back on Diana. The beheading thing was particularly in vogue in the time of Henry V111 although it was in practise long before. Only joking, I know its the stone mushroom thing which you talk of, how it came about, naw haven’t got a clue.

  8. Hi Alistair, you have a wide garden there so you can use those ornaments. But i love most the blackish-purple grass, i wonder how its flowers look like if it does. I was also amused at your conversation with Carolyn, lol.

  9. aloha,

    this is a beautiful plant, i think it would work so well with your black mondo as a combination….love all the statuary and focal points in your beautiful garden.

  10. The aged and weathered look of those last few garden ornaments is so beautiful. The spotting and moss on it make it look almost exactly like real stone. Do you wonder how much the 26 year old Haddonstone planter is worth now thanks to its aged look?

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