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Tricyrtis Hirta — 54 Comments

  1. Hi Alistair, Your toad lily is so exotic looking and beautiful. I have lots of dappled shade, but not the moist conditions that I believe they prefer. The various shots of your garden all show it off splendidly. The cat in mid-air is quite amazing. What a dare devil! This summer I have admired Filipendula on another blog and in a local garden. I would like to know more about it and so look forward to that future post.

  2. I have often considered getting a toad lily, but have each time decided against it. I think it would be a bit too dry here. Yours is pretty, though. Such an unusual flower. Great action shot of Purdee! You have a cornucopia of blooms and beauty in your garden. Very pretty. Sorry you had to lose the Silver Birch – it looks lovely there.

  3. So fun to find a post about those cute lilies that look like little orchids and not a bit like toads– who names these things? I have a couple types of these plants and they both need moving out from under other things that got big. Very nice to read about what sort of neighborhood to seek for them. They are so dependable and pretty. And I must add that I am extremely impressed with your flying cat, very rare.

  4. Your captures are beautiful and so are your flowers and landscape. I am surprised that you only started to be interested with photography last year.

    That flying cat is amazing! What a spectacular capture!

  5. Hi Alistair – your Toad Lily is lovely and looks very exotic. I’m amazed at how everything just thrives in your garden. Every area looks so lovely and well kept, not a leaf out of place 🙂
    Your Clematis looks fabulous – I have two tiny Clematis – new ones I was given. They have just started new growth and I’m holding thumbs they grow well. I will be so thrilled if they ever look half as good as yours.

    PS: Purdees skills are indeed impressive!!

  6. I think I have fallen in love with toad lilies Alistair, beautiful flowers. Your Etoile Violette flowered a lot later than mine, which also got attacked by mildew, very sad, they are wonderful plants. Your woodland area is lovely.

    • Hi Janet, the Etoile Violette has been in flower since the second week in July. Plants which burn out in the south can hang on and on here patiently waiting for a bit more heat in the sun to arrive.

  7. Your nooks and crannies in the garden are so beautiful. You have so many great plant combinations. This is the first year that I have grown Toad lilies and I have just loved having then in the late summer and fall garden.

  8. Alistair, toad lilies are hardy where we are, (USDA zone 6a, although I don’t know how that translates to where you are) and we have pretty harsh winters.

    They are incredibly gorgeous – they remind me of orchids, and when you are strolling in the woodland garden, you don’t expect to see something like that blooming next to the fountain. (Then again, you don’t expect to see the fountain either!) Ours bloomed earlier than usual this year, in part, I think, because the early part of the summer was wet and not as hot as it usually is. I have three plants but put it on my wish list to add some more next spring. They are one of the few things we have blooming this late in the season in the woodland garden aside from some reblooming hostas and roses of Sharon, and I want to get some different colors as well. (There is a Japanese one that is pink/mauve and cream.)

    As for your little nooks…. they are absolutely wonderful, havens, all of them. I could curl up with my Kindle and never leave!

    • Cathy, Hostas which rebloom, I doubt that would happen here. I am addicted to novel reading, starting to have a little difficulty now unless the book is being illuminated with strong light, think I will have a look at these kindle things.

  9. Toad-lilies are completely hardy without winter protection in the mid-Atlantic U.S. As far as moisture, I have had way more die from too much water than not enough so I always recommend a well-drained site for them. My favorites are: ‘Sinonome’ spectacular, Empress, T. latifolia (yellow), and ‘Miyazaki’. Love the cat photo–I am a cat person.

  10. Love tricyrtis alistair, love them, they should do well here, they did on islay…….action stole the show cat!
    The middle of that tricyrtis looks like a passion flower (minus the spots of course) with those crazy stigmas.
    Love the clematis too. Ace post.

  11. Hi Alistair, I enjoyed looking at the latest photos of your garden, still looking so lush and superb in autumn. And good timing too with the jumping cat!

    Toad lily flowers are up there as one of my favourite flowers and something I look forward to seeing between late summer till autumn. All of ours seems a bit later than usual to bloom this year and they are all still in bud, but should open in the next few days. I commend the way you photographed them, they look so vivid and the colours seems to jump out of our computer screen, a visual delight! 🙂

  12. Dear Alastair, I love the Tricyrtis Hirta, but I prefer to call it Spot (common, non scientific name!) I love all the photos of the garden, beautiful photographic compositions, but my outstanding favourite is the one with the flying cat. cheers, catmint

  13. Your Toad Lily captured my heart… it is divine! Cold hearty? I need that. But what about hot Summer? Unfortunately I have that too. I’ll have to check into this… maybe even take a risk. LOVE that gorgeous blossom.

  14. Those are exceptionally good photos of Tricyrtis. I love the purple Acer palmatum leaves as a backdrop. I suppose that won’t last long as the trees mature. I agree about Tricyrtis & dryness. I can’t keep them alive through the desiccation of my garden in summer, even with moderate irrigation.

  15. Again, love the tricyrtis with the purple foliage behind it. Is that an acer in the background?

    My C. Etoile Violette is reblooming at the moment also. It is nice to have another touch of early summer before the big winter plunge.
    Julie

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