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Berberis x Ottawensis f purpurea Superba — 26 Comments

  1. Wow I love the village…great pub across from a lovely church. I would be watching people from the pub going in and out of the church…a heathen my mom would call me. Such a quaint village that feels homey. Those are large houses indeed. With retirement I want to downsize at some point myself.

    I have one barberry left, a purple pillar variety. Here they have become a nuisance and can be quite aggressive due to birds eating and then leaving seed all over. I like the new look of the blog but was unsure what had happened to your blog name. It appears as Mountain Creek.

    • Hi Donna
      The mountain creek theme was added for 30 minutes as I had screwed up my site by attempting to add css stuff. (I will never) learn, my son in law has got it back to normal. The village does have a very old world appearance.

  2. Hi Alistair,
    Enjoyed your pictorial tour round your new village and the Berberis descriptions. I have a specimen of Berberis thunbergii f atropurpurea which has been “let go” and now must be around 9′ tall and is due a chop if I can brave those thorns! It gets mildew every year regardless of the weather and has one attribute I dislike, have you ever noticed the rather off putting scent?
    I do not use WP and I am surprised that there is not an option when adding a link to add a “no follow” but if you can access your HTML code I hope this example will explain what you have to do.

    ………………….href=”http://www.plant-world-seeds.com/”>Plant World
    Seeds…………

    ADD rel=”nofollow”

    ………………….href=”http://www.plant-world-seeds.com/”rel=”nofollow”> Plant World Seeds………..

  3. I love your neighborhood, all the history, character and that paved street. Great tour. you make me jealous of the pretty surroundings. LOL. Glad you are enjoying your walks. I bet you can’t wait for gardening season.

    • Donna, I am itching to get going with the garden although most of the Summer will be taken up with the house extension. Talk of surroundings! well have the rest of you seen where Donna lives. By the way, have you ever heard anything from b-a-g?

  4. You’ve picked a lovely village to call home now Alistair. It looks a nice place to live. I hope Myra is continuing to feel better.
    The Berberis Helmond Pillar is one I’ve often looked at but found it hard to visualise in my garden. Thanks to your picture I can see it now. Thanks for the recommendations and btw, I like the Berberis trimmed neatly by the front door, it look wonderful with the lower growing conifer.

  5. Hi Alistair, what an attractive village, and quite large too, no wonder you find you have so much in easy walking distance. It was such a pleasure to be able to walk to the dentist the other day, there are so many advantages to living somewhere that you don’t need to drive as much, aren’t there. I agree that the co-op could improve its window display somewhat… I inherited a Berberis purpurea, though it is planted in a daft place, right next to the (narrow) path that leads to the compost bins. Something tells me I will be pruning it regularly to keep it within bounds, though I doubt I will get results as immaculate as yours. They are beautiful plants, if a tad spiky.

  6. What a nice little town. Looks like it has everything one could need. And so picturesque, too. Are those cobblestone streets? I love the look of them! I also love berberis, although I think they have a bad reputation for being invasive. I have never heard of the Helmond pillar. Looks like it would be very useful for some areas. I’ll have to check it out!

  7. Hi Alistair
    So nice to see your Berberis Thunbergii Harlequin, I have just bought one! I am planning to grow it in a container with some other plants, and ‘Helmond pillar’ has been on my wish list for a long time but I don’t really have a good place for it so I have managed to resist buying one. It looks lovely on photos though so I might try to grow it in a less ideal space, just because I really want it!

    Lovely to see your village and amenities, but when did you take the photos – very early morning? There are absolutely no people around, completely deserted! I can see some cars around but not one person 🙂

    • Helene, Harlequin does very well in a container, needs a sunny spot to get best colour.It was about 9.30am when I took the pictures. My daughter seems to think 60% of the population is made up with oldies, however when school comes out some of the roads are choc-a-bloc with cars. Kids have to be careful, whilst collecting my grandson last week we spotted one twelve year old boy being thrown into the air after being hit by a car. We heard later that he got away with bruises only.

  8. I used to give myself an imaginary amount of money to go window shopping for houses in our local paper. The money I would need for anything approaching my dreams crept up and up. When it reached half a million I could no longer even imagine having so much money to spend so I had to give up and become reconciled to my (housing association) home and stop even imagining I will ever be able to buy one of my own. But still . . . I look at lovely houses . . . in lovely villages . . .

      • I did feel a bit sick by the time I was trying to imagine half a million. But for a while I told myself ‘if you are dreaming, it doesn’t matter how big you dream’ – and I wanted something old, away from the road, with a big garden, hills easily reachable and a village shop. Of course, it depends quite a lot on which part of the country you are looking in but, even so, I learnt that dreams need to be only a bit beyond reach in order to retain their pleasure.

  9. Hi Alistair, some grand houses there with some very characteristic “village” features (the pub, church and Co-op). It has a quaint feel with some lovely old buildings, cobblestone and side streets. It will be interesting to see what the most common garden plants are, e.g. those that do very well for the climate and soil or are sold at ludicrously low prices at the local Garden Centre.

  10. Your village is completely charming! It seems to have everything necessary for body and soul! As for your snipping habits, I am in that club with you. Pruning is my favorite of all garden chores, and my philosophy is that all plants can benefit from proper pruning. (What is proper pruning? Now that may be debatable!)

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