HomeGardening NewsGardens in generalClematis Montana Mayleen in our Cheshire Garden

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Clematis Montana Mayleen in our Cheshire Garden — 33 Comments

  1. The Montana Group are very desirable usually as long as you have some space, my current favourite is ‘Giant Star’ which it certainly is. The one thing that many people miss, which you mentioned, is that in general they have a very pleasant vanilla scent. Best of luck with your building project Alistair.

    • Thanks Rick, I have always been led to believe that Mayleen was rather unique in having the fragrance, perhaps it is simply more pronounced in this one.

  2. Maylene is gorgeous. I love her color. She looks beautiful on the trellis! I only have one clematis, “H. F. Young’. I am waiting for it to become well-established and give me the flower show that is advertised!

  3. I must admit I do prefer clematis’ in pruning group 3, it’s great to be able to cut the whole thing down in February and get rid of the everything from last year. That said, I do have an evergreen clematis – and I have had a white Clematis montana before, many years ago flowering double flowers in the spring and single later on. It grew up my tall cedar tree and it got broken by foxes digging a den around the base of the tree. Eventually the whole thing just died. I wasn’t that sorry to see it go and decided to not have another plant up that tree again. Your pink Mayleen looks lovely, and sounds much more suited to a small garden than what I had – it was a monster! Can’t remember now what I had, perhaps it was grandiflorum, but I do remember the single and double flowers, I often had them both at the same time. This was before I started my meticulous record of plants in my garden 🙂

    Good luck with all the work you are doing to the house, I hope when the dust has settled and everything is finished that Myra will start to enjoy your new house and surroundings.

    • Helene, we have a really healthy looking evergreen clematis armandii. It didn’t flower and my neighbour says it never has in the past twelve years. I found out that it had been getting pruned back every year in Summer. I expect she was cutting off all the shoots which would have flowered in Winter. Its just outside our kitchen window and Myra is getting concerned at how untidy its getting already.

  4. Two beautiful clematis. Glad to see they are doing well in the new garden. Upheaval indeed – I can sympathize with you Alistair as we are undergoing a bathroom reno. It will come to an end one day.

  5. What a timely post Alistair. I’ve just been gifted a tiny wee C. montana Mylene by a neighbour. I’ve potted it into a larger pit and will nurture it until Autumn. By then I might have found an ideal spot for it.
    I do hope Myra can finally settle once the downstairs loo is done. Your move has really taken its toll on her. Wishing her all the best.

  6. Hi Alistair, I’ve been thinking about Montana clematis and large rambling roses to grow up the trees we have at the back of the garden, the only issue is with keeping them watered as they establish as it is relatively dry, being underneath all that canopy. Mature Montana covering trees and small garden buildings is very impressive in full flower.

  7. Hi Alistair!
    Oh my gosh you are taking the wonderful new place in hand! Surely you have a clear vision, and it is coming along nicely. I love the Montana clematis– one of the ones I was able to propagate from cuttings. I look forward to it climbing over your garden building. My grandma had a chicken house similarly roofed in a Cecile Brunner climbing rose…

  8. That clematis will look divine scrambling over a shed, will make a shed look very pretty. I hope Myra feels better soon. It was a huge thing leaving your house and garden and moving so far away. But it must be lovely being so close to your famiy now.

  9. Mayleen sounds rather splendid, a great plant to inherit. No clematis here as yet, an autumn project, assuming we manage to get the fence sorted and the trellis painted. Hope your building work goes smoothly. Such things are always tiring, but hopefully the end result will be worth the chaos.

  10. Alistair, my garden proves the different, I bought 2 C.Montanas shortly after moving here, C.M. Alba died after a couple of years and plain C. Montana is still alive but isn’t doing much, I keep going to move it but with the lack of gardening weather and so many things that need doing it gets pushed to the back, yours looks lovely,

    sorry Myra is still unsettled, a downstairs loo sounds good thinking, I’m glad now my house is on one level, no stairs to tackle, I hope when the building is finished and hopefully we get some summer weather things will start to look brighter, Frances

    • Hi Frances
      Thanks for letting us know that Montana has its limits to endurance. We once had a journey up to a place in the far north called Betty Hill where a Montana was growing surprisingly well. Mind you, it was in a sheltered situation. Thanks for asking about Myra, I think all will be well once things are in order here.

  11. Your blog doesn’t seem to recognize me anymore. I have Montana Rubens clematis but like the two that you have highlighted much more, better color. Maybe it is for the best that you aren’t doing all that work. It leaves more time for enjoying life and gardening.

    • Carolyn, we now realise that what we intended doing was simply unnecessary, which means we are already enjoying the garden. Mind you the interior of the house has virtually been torn apart and a team of tradesmen are bashing on with it. Not positive of what you mean blog doesn’t recognise you.

      • perhaps Carolyn means no avatar for her?

        We’re still waiting, and then there will be renovations.

        One day, Myra will be able to enjoy her new home in peace and quiet – and it will be lovely!

        • Ah! that probably is the problem Carolyn speaks of. Hope all goes well with your renovations when the time comes, I am sure Myra is going to be a lot better once we get rid of the hit squad.

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