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Pulmonaria Roy Davidson — 26 Comments

  1. Pulmonaria is yet another plant I haven’t had in my garden yet – well, there are MANY plants I haven’t grown yet, not because I don’t want to, but simply for lack of space. With a slightly bigger garden soon to be started I might find space for this beauty, especially since it is blue, I have very few truly blue-flowering plants.

    I had a look at your plant list, great work! Do the numbers behind the plant names refer to how many you have of each or is it something else? What will you do when you get new plants and have to put them in between these to keep it alphabetically, will that be a problem? I know the issue of catering for tablets and phones from my own website, you really can’t win….not until there is a browser that truly is cross-platform and that’s probably unlikely to come. But if you add a sentence like “for phones and tablets: tap to reveal plant names and info” – at least you have made it obvious for people what they can do 🙂

    Jersey Plants is a great place to get cheap plants, especially now when they have started to sell jumbo plugs and starter plants – I have shopped there for many years.

    • The Pulmonatia is a great plant for the Spring Helene, To be honest I have to work on the Spring garden show, at the moment its all about Summer.
      Thanks for your observations regarding my A to Z plant list, some of them do have numbers it simply relates to the fact that I may have taken say 12 pictures and deleted most of them without removing the numbers on the existing ones.
      Off to see if there is more news on your new house.
      Oh, forgot to say, thumbnails for new plants that I add are easy to set up.

  2. Your garden is looking wonderful Alistair, I love the gravel. I have a similar in my garden and find it useful for pots – just as you have.
    I love Pulmonaria Blue Ensign but find exactly as you did in Aberdeen that is disappears in summer. The others I grow I have no name for and do stay evergreen and as you suggest, cutting them right back after flowering ensures they look great for the rest of the year.
    I’ll bet you are glad to be down there this spring, it’s still very cold up here yet! Happy Springtime to you both 🙂

    • Thanks Angie, interesting to hear that you have similar experience with Blue Ensign. Since January I have been watching the temperatures in the East of Scotland and to be honest it hasn’t been any warmer here. The more marked difference seems to come from late Spring through till Autumn.

  3. Pulmonaria is very useful in the woodland garden I find, Alistair. It needs little attention and is easy to divide and move around. I agree the common name is yukky, but if you recall your high school Latin, pulmonarius means ‘of the lungs.’ One of the few bits of Latin I remember. Your A-Z is very impressive and looks like a lot of work went into it. The garden is looking great! P. x

    • Hi Pam, I found a lot of information about the lung stuff, which perhaps I should have shared. My A to Z has built up over the years, how it looks now was pretty time consuming.

  4. I am a big fan of Pulmonaria. It always does well here and self-sows all over the place. You know spring has arrived when it starts to flower. Your A to Z listing of plants is impressive and a great resource for anyone who wants to know more about particular plants. Happy Easter to you and your family Alistair!

  5. A plant I added a few years ago. I love blue in the garden and if it is blue it gains entrance. I also love your blue containers. It is what I have also.

  6. Hello Alistair, your garden is looking stunning, as always, especially in the spring sun. For the gravel – have you put grid matting down to stop the gravel migrating – especially onto the grass? You might have to take care when mowing the edge of this as the lawn mover could suck up the gravel too.

    • I didnt put down a grid matting Sunil but I did put down a good quality membrane to stop the weeds coming through. Also I sunk in metal edging around the grass just low enough to allow the mower to run over it.

  7. blue glazed pots are on my wish list as soon as the builders are gone.
    Been sidetracked reading your about. Hope the ache for Aberdeen will ease as the garden seasons bring you, and your readers, fresh joy. Yours has good bones and I can’t wait to see it fill out and in.

  8. I very much doubt you will regret getting rid of that grass Alistair! I suspect that, were you to add patches of toning pebbles and larger rocks, together with some plants growing through it, you would find you could replace the rest of the grass quite easily too, its what I did in my last garden, much more room for plants, which although people assume is more work, really isn’t if you plant densely and choose good performers, as you know yourself!

    Love pulmonarias, a new discovery for me, there were clumps here when we moved in which I duly split and relocated. I’ve since bought severy more. And incidentally I’ve found the same as you viz perennials, and now prefer to buy in 9cm pots, much more affordable when you want to plant in threes or even fives. Happy Spring!

  9. My climate is a bit too far south for pulmonaria, but that did not keep me from trying it! It went dormant in summer as yours did in Aberdeen. It came back weakly for several years. I have not seen it yet this year, but I am hoping. I love the leaves!

    Your garden is looking wonderful. I like the gravel area with your great selection of pots; everything is so neat!

  10. Hi Alistair, you certainly seem to have saved yourself a lot of trouble by introducing the gravel and giving a perfect foil for your containers. I have a few young plants of P.’Blue Ensign’ and although they are in flower now they certainly disappeared completely during the winter so do not provide the ground cover of the more “evergreen” forms.

    • Rick, I initially thought Blue Ensign was objecting to the Aberdeen climate, looks like what you and others have said it is just the habit. I am pleased with the gravel, I am beginning to wish I had left a little more width to the grass and created a gravel path around the garden, it is so boggy in Winter.

  11. Alistair, this is an important plant in my spring garden. It dies back quite a bit here in winter sometimes blooming with few leaves which come out later. We also call it Bethlehem Sage here…not sure why. I like how you added the gravel to the back garden. Looks wonderful. Here using small plants will take years to grow in but I still use them.

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